Relapse Is Not a Failure: Getting Back on the Recovery Road

No matter how hard you work at your recovery, you may experience a relapse. While addiction treatments are designed to help prevent it, a relapse is not uncommon.

Individuals with various chronic diseases experience relapse, and addiction is no different. In fact, past research has found that the relapse rates for addiction are similar to those of asthma and other chronic illnesses.

It’s important to not see relapse as a personal failure, and to not blame yourself and others for it. While the human brain’s ability to recover from substance abuse is remarkable, relapse is a normal part of the process. If you continue to seek support from your medical and recovery team, and keep up your treatments, you’ll be able to rebound and get back on track.

Navigating New Emotional States in Recovery

One of the least-expected experiences for individuals starting recovery is the emotional roller-coaster, the extreme states of new feelings. Anger can be especially a struggle, not to mention very self-destructive.

As with other aspects of your life, you may be challenged to return to the basics. You may need to learn or relearn the tools of emotional control.

When you were addicted to drugs or alcohol, you likely never properly learned how to manage finances, take care of yourself and build healthy relationships. It’s the same way with emotions — addiction may have caused you to become numb for a long time, and you may no longer know how to respond to your emotional states.

The Rewards of Embracing Simplicity

Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated. — Confucius

Living a simple life. Sounds boring, on the surface, but is it? And why should you even think about simplifying your life?

Over the last few decades of industrial and technological growth, we’ve been conditioned to want more, accumulate more, do more. In the whirlwind of this nonstop quest, it’s hard to find a moment to quiet the mind.

5 Daily Habits to Form on Your Recovery Journey

Every moment is a fresh beginning. — T.S. Eliot

As you begin your journey to recovery from drug or alcohol addiction, one of the biggest challenges is to break your old habits. As an addict, you had certain routines and behaviors — and sobriety leaves a void that you’ll need to fill with new habits.

Don’t expect this to be easy or fast. Think about how long it took you to form your old habits — months? Years? While a popular concept is that it takes 28 to 30 days to form a new habit, some studies have shown that it takes much longer than that. You’re in this for the long haul.

How to Use Nature as Your Therapy

And into the forest I go, to lose my mind and find my soul…” —John Muir

The sun-kissed summer season is a special time in the Pacific Northwest. While we’re blessed with warm weather for much of the year, summer is when we can finally count on clear skies. The whirl of activity on the local beaches, at the campgrounds and on the waters of Puget Sound reminds us what a natural jewel this area is.

Do you remember the last time you hiked in the woods, relaxed by a waterfall or lake, or took a walk on a beach while waves splashed at your feet?

Page 1 of 8

Facebook

Calendar

loader

Open Meetings

20Nov
11.20.2018 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
21Nov
11.21.2018 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
24Nov
11.24.2018 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
27Nov
11.27.2018 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
28Nov
11.28.2018 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Contact Details

Olalla Recovery Centers

Olalla Guest Lodge
12850 Lala Cove Lane SE Olalla, WA 98359

Gig Harbor Counseling
Direct Phone # 253-851-2552

5122 Olympic Drive NW, Suite A105 Gig Harbor, WA 98335

1-800-882-6201
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.