Christine Lynch

Christine Lynch

Christine has been with Olalla Recovery Centers since 2000. Prior to her work in chemical dependency, Christine worked in the law enforcement and legal field for over ten years. She has a degree in psychology, business administration and human resource management. Christine oversees the organization as directed by the Board of Directors. She has a degree in Psychology, with minors in Business Administration and Human Resource Management.

Check in with how you’re feeling, tune into your emotions. Whether you’re anxious, sleepless, hopeful, angry, or anything in between, take a minute for yourself, allow yourself to find your quiet place and just enjoy the jellyfish.

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
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Finding pleasure in simple things


Joy in life doesn’t always come from big moments. The simplest things can bring the greatest pleasures.

Focusing on the big picture right now may feel daunting — savor the delights of the simple experiences instead.

Here’s some inspiration:

  • Express yourself creatively: Write a poem. Start a scrapbook. Learn to fold origami.
  • Grow something: Green thumbs are nurtured, not born. Small-container herbs. A beautiful orchid. An easy-care cactus. Care for a plant and watch it thrive.
  • Capture the moment: Document your memories of these historic times in a journal. Or simply catch a fleeting moment on your smartphone camera.
  • Upcycle: Turn a cardboard box into a basket or obsolete CDs into wall art. You’ll unleash your creativity and do something good for Mother Earth at the same time.

Even a good book, a fresh cup of tea savored in the morning, or a thank-you note can be uplifting. Just know where to look.

 

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
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FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.
GO HERE: to see them all.

Keeping your faith during social isolation

Physical and emotional healing during the pandemic are important, but don’t ignore your spiritual wellbeing. Lean on your faith and look for ways to nourish your positive emotions.

Some things you can do to stay spiritually strong:

  • If you’re not able to get together with your faith community in person, look for live-streamed worship services online.
  • Keep a gratitude journal by your nightstand. At the end of the day, write down three things you’re grateful for.
  • Continue praying for yourself and others. Your Higher Power hasn’t stopped listening.
  • Take time for contemplation — watch the sun set or enjoy a quiet moment outside.
  • Share love and compassion with others. Reach out to a family member with an encouraging word or a neighbor in need.

Maintaining faith is not just about attending a group event once a week. Feed your soul by embracing your fears. Focus on positive thoughts. And remember all the good things in your life.

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
SUBSCRIBE: to our weekly Recovery Lifehacks - COVID-19 delivered to your inbox.
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.
GO HERE: to see them all.

Maintain Wellness To Maintain Your Recovery Goals - Creative Ideas To Sustain Your Physical, Spiritual And Mental Wellness While Distancing

After months of home quarantine and limited access to activities, no doubt you’re feeling the collective cabin fever. Maintaining wholistic wellness in these times takes a lot of creative thinking, but don’t give up on the idea of staying in shape physically, mentally and spiritually—maintaining wholistic wellness is important to maintaining your recovery goals.

There are plenty of resources out there. Use these ideas for inspiration.

Keep the body moving

It’s much too easy right now to spend most of the day on the couch, streaming TV shows or browsing the internet. Build movement into your day — schedule it on the calendar if that’s what keeps you accountable.

You don’t need a gym to maintain an exercise routine. Try these alternatives:

  • Take brisk walks daily around your neighborhood. If you have a park nearby, even better — being in nature provides an additional mood booster.
  • Go equipment-less. Create a workout that doesn’t involve weights — with sit-ups, squats, burpees, etc. And think outside the box if you want to add some weights in: Milk or juice jugs with handles, for example, could do the trick.
  • Learn yoga online. Search for “free online yoga classes” and you’ll find lots of options, both on YouTube and from professional studios. Or if high-energy is more your style, lookup Zumba or kick-boxing instead.
  • Declutter your home. Besides keeping you physically engaged, reorganizing your closets or simplifying other areas also gives you back a sense of control — not to mention a feeling of calm in a tidier space.

Don’t ignore other physical needs

Exercise is only one component of physical health. Here are a few others:

  • Maintain your regular bedtime schedule and other routines like taking showers and getting out of PJs, even if you’re not working. If you allow your days to blend together, you’ll find it much more difficult to get back on track later.
  • Continue eating meals at consistent times. And beware of stress eating, which is common right now. Channel that stress reaction into something more productive, like writing in a journal or talking to a friend.
  • If you have some time to fill, why not take an online cooking class to learn a new skill? You can learn anything from ethnic cuisines to baking for free or as little as $1 per class.

Nourish the mind and soul

Just like spending too much time on the couch is not good for your body, spending hours on end online and on social media is not good for your mind and soul. Especially these days, as the pandemic dominates the news cycle.

Some simple ideas to help you stay mentally and spiritually strong:

  • Keep a daily gratitude journal. It can be very simple, like writing down, at the end of the day, three positive things that happened.
  • Stay in touch with your faith community. Many faith groups are conducting online worship services and staying connected via social media.
  • Learn to meditate. Meditation can help reduce stress as well as help you practice mindfulness. Various resources, like UCLA’s Mindful Awareness Resources Center, offer free guided meditations
  • Learn something new. Websites like Coursera and Udemy include free options such as MOOC (massive online open course) classes offered by major universities, and many libraries provide free access to lynda.com for their patrons. You can find topics ranging from photography and career planning to playing guitar and organizing.
  • Check in with your recovery peers. Many recovery-support groups, like AA, are resuming in-person gatherings, so reach out. And if you can’t get meet in person, look for other opportunities like getting together for virtual check-ins or for a small outdoor picnic.
  • Do something uplifting, whether that’s helping a neighbor in need, providing encouragement to a struggling peer, planting some colorful blooms or live-streaming a virtual comedy show.

There’s nothing normal about COVID-19 life but don’t let the physical isolation derail your recovery goals. If you’re struggling or need extra encouragement, lean into your support network and don’t hesitate to reach out for professional help.

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
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READ MORE: on our website.
SCHEDULE AN ASSESSMENT: Call our outpatient office 253-851-2552 directly.
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.

3 simple tips for physical fitness at home

 

Maintaining a fitness routine during the pandemic is a struggle if you’re used to running to the gym or the yoga studio. But like everything else in quarantine, all it takes is a little creative thinking to keep the momentum going.

Simple things you can do when you can’t hit the gym:

  • Hit the trails instead. Brisk walking or running are excellent for your fitness and if you have a park nearby, being in nature and fresh air is a bonus.
  • No weights or equipment? No problem. Use common household items — like laundry or milk jugs — to add weight and resistance.
  • Get “Zooming.” Many gyms and workout studios are offering classes via video conference, including free sessions. And of course, there’s always YouTube for following along.

And if you run out of ideas, think of simple ways to get the heart pumping, like deep cleaning and weeding. Then you can check some chores off your list too.

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
SUBSCRIBE: to our weekly Recovery Lifehacks - COVID-19 delivered to your inbox.
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.
GO HERE: to see them all.

The pandemic has upended everyone’s lives, but coping may be especially difficult for youth. Many have been physically isolated from their friends and peers for months and have been left without their typical coping mechanisms like sports and social activities.

Clearing your mind by keeping your hands busy


The whirlwind of strong emotions induced by the pandemic can knock anyone off balance. But how can you quiet your mind, at least for a little while? One simple way to clear the mind clutter is by keeping your hands busy with rhythmic, repetitive or creative activities.

Tactile activities like painting and knitting can feel therapeutic and even meditative. That’s because, neuroscientists say, “busy hands” alter brain chemistry the same way some medication does.

Even cleaning can help you relax and create a mental "space”. Not to mention it gives you back a sense of control and a tidier living space — plus, reduced clutter itself boosts mental health.

Cleaning or knitting not your thing? Tinker with a DIY project. Color in an adult coloring book. Put together a puzzle. The results don’t matter. Just enjoy the moment.

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
SUBSCRIBE: to our weekly Recovery Lifehacks - COVID-19 delivered to your inbox.
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.
GO HERE: to see them all.

Finding your calm is more important now - than ever. We invite you turn your sound up and just take a moment, be still - breathe and listen to the calm of the waves...

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
SELF ASSESSMENT: Do you need help?
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.
SUBSCRIBE: to our weekly Recovery Lifehacks - COVID-19 delivered to your inbox.
GO HERE: to see them all.

Grieving for a changed world is perfectly normal


Anger. Frustration. Anxiety. Fear. Sadness. You’ve likely gone through these emotions — indeed, through an emotional rollercoaster — at some point during recovery. But this time is undeniably different. We are collectively grieving, and this grief threatens to derail even the most-resilient among us.

All these emotions are normal. Accept them rather than fighting. Allow yourself to grieve for a changed world. You don’t have any power over over what’s happening on the outside but you can choose how to respond. Find a balance between exploring your feelings and calming yourself by coming back into the present moment.

Let go of what you can’t control. Remember that even this new normal is temporary — and  this, too, you can overcome.

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
SUBSCRIBE: to our weekly Recovery Lifehacks - COVID-19 delivered to your inbox.
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.
GO HERE: to see them all.

The importance of maintaining a routine and structure


You’ve worked hard to develop a healthy routine in your journey to recovery. Then the pandemic turned your life on its head, disrupting everything from your shopping patterns and recovery meetings to various productive activities.

Even simple routines are tough to maintain when each day blends into the next. But you can’t afford to lose momentum and threaten your progress. Whether or not you have to leave your house for work, appointments and social activities, don’t break your daily rituals. If you do, getting back to a structured schedule will be that much harder.

Continue your morning routine — even if you’ll been spending the entire day at home. Do something that feels productive. And reward yourself by doing something you enjoy and breaking the monotony of isolation.

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
SUBSCRIBE: to our weekly Recovery Lifehacks - COVID-19 delivered to your inbox.
GO HERE: to see them all.
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.

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Olalla Recovery Centers

Olalla Guest Lodge
12850 Lala Cove Lane SE Olalla, WA 98359

Gig Harbor Counseling
Direct Phone # 253-851-2552

5122 Olympic Drive, Suite A105 Gig Harbor, WA 98335

1-800-882-6201
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