Christine Lynch

Christine Lynch

Christine has been with Olalla Recovery Centers since 2000. Prior to her work in chemical dependency, Christine worked in the law enforcement and legal field for over ten years. She has a degree in psychology, business administration and human resource management. Christine oversees the organization as directed by the Board of Directors. She has a degree in Psychology, with minors in Business Administration and Human Resource Management.

Finding your calm is more important now - than ever. We invite you turn your sound up and just take a moment, be still - breathe and listen to the calm of the waves...

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
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Grieving for a changed world is perfectly normal


Anger. Frustration. Anxiety. Fear. Sadness. You’ve likely gone through these emotions — indeed, through an emotional rollercoaster — at some point during recovery. But this time is undeniably different. We are collectively grieving, and this grief threatens to derail even the most-resilient among us.

All these emotions are normal. Accept them rather than fighting. Allow yourself to grieve for a changed world. You don’t have any power over over what’s happening on the outside but you can choose how to respond. Find a balance between exploring your feelings and calming yourself by coming back into the present moment.

Let go of what you can’t control. Remember that even this new normal is temporary — and  this, too, you can overcome.

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
SUBSCRIBE: to our weekly Recovery Lifehacks - COVID-19 delivered to your inbox.
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.
GO HERE: to see them all.

The importance of maintaining a routine and structure


You’ve worked hard to develop a healthy routine in your journey to recovery. Then the pandemic turned your life on its head, disrupting everything from your shopping patterns and recovery meetings to various productive activities.

Even simple routines are tough to maintain when each day blends into the next. But you can’t afford to lose momentum and threaten your progress. Whether or not you have to leave your house for work, appointments and social activities, don’t break your daily rituals. If you do, getting back to a structured schedule will be that much harder.

Continue your morning routine — even if you’ll been spending the entire day at home. Do something that feels productive. And reward yourself by doing something you enjoy and breaking the monotony of isolation.

CALL: 1-800-882-6201 to talk to someone.
SUBSCRIBE: to our weekly Recovery Lifehacks - COVID-19 delivered to your inbox.
GO HERE: to see them all.
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.

Don't let COVID-19 steal your emotional connections


Addiction thrives in isolation, but recovery relies on social connections. Social distancing has forced us into physical seclusion — and that means finding creative ways to remain connected emotionally.

Eye contact is important to a human connection. Use technology — apps like FaceTime, Skype and Zoom — to check in with your friends and family. Accountability doesn’t stop during a pandemic; in fact, it’s more important than ever.

Connect with the recovery community through social media platforms such as Instagram and Facebook. Ask your 12-step program or group counseling about video meetings or the relaunch of in-person ones. Organize an outdoor picnic with a small group of your peers (while observing social distancing).

Even a simple phone call to a loved one helps you stay in touch. Lean into your support circle — and don’t be afraid to reach out.

CALL NOW 24/7: 1-800-882-6201 to get started.
SUBSCRIBE: to our weekly Recovery Lifehacks - COVID-19 delivered to your inbox.
GO HERE: to see them all.
FIND A MEETING: Go here to search for an AA or AN meeting near you.

The pandemic has upended everyone’s lives, but coping may be especially difficult for youth. Many have been physically isolated from their friends and peers for months and have been left without their typical coping mechanisms like sports and social activities.

Many school districts are launching the school year with online instruction, and adolescents will once again find themselves with a lot of idle time on their hands. Just like adults, they are grieving for their loss of normalcy — and just like adults, they may be turning to unhealthy behaviors in response.

Most people likely know they can take first-aid and CPR training to help someone in a medical emergency — but did you know you can also learn mental health first aid? It’s an invaluable set of skills that can help anyone identify signs and symptoms of a developing mental health problem and respond in a crisis.

In these times of social isolation, mental wellness is even more important than ever, but many individuals find it difficult to cope. Mental health first aid training can not only give you the skills to help a distressed individual but also break down any stigmas and negative attitudes associated with mental health.

The violence sweeping our nation underscores the systemic racism and discrimination against people of color. We are saddened by George Floyd’s tragic death and the pain and anger that the black community is going through. We stand in unity and solidarity with all individuals of color, and we support the tough conversations that need to take place about social injustice in America.

Despite the recent federal ban on the sale of tobacco products to anyone under age 21, media reports show that hasn’t stopped teens from vaping. And while the FDA has also banned many flavored electronic cigarettes, youth are finding ways to exploit a loophole that still allows flavored disposable products.

E-cigarettes are a growing trend that is not only contributing to nicotine addiction among teens but is also causing lung injuries and other health concerns. Parents need to understand the facts — and learn how they can help their kids.

Due to the Coronavirus concerns, Olalla Recovery Centers is temporarily suspending all open self-help meetings (AA, NA, Al-Anon, Nar-Anon) at Olalla Guest Lodge. We are also suspending our Family Program on Saturday & Sunday and suspending all outside visitation. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this might cause. We are operating under the guidance from health care authorities and are striving to protect the health of our employees and patients during this outbreak. Gig Harbor Counseling will continue to deliver Telehealth services and will be easing into offering onsite services. Call 253-851-2552 for more information.

New research published early this year showed that alcohol abuse has reached an epidemic level in the United States. Nearly 1 million Americans age 16 and up have died in less than a decade due to alcohol — surpassing drug overdoses by almost 300,000.

This trend is concerning by itself, by the COVID-19 pandemic makes it even more so. Alcohol consumption can weaken the immune system, making individuals more vulnerable to this novel coronavirus. And according to market research and media reports, sales of alcohol have climbed in March — indicating the potential of alcohol abuse.

 

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Contact Details

Olalla Recovery Centers

Olalla Guest Lodge
12850 Lala Cove Lane SE Olalla, WA 98359

Gig Harbor Counseling
Direct Phone # 253-851-2552

5122 Olympic Drive, Suite A105 Gig Harbor, WA 98335

1-800-882-6201
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